Tag Archives: scent

pepsiscent

Pepsi to develop a ‘scent capsule’ so your drinks smell less like plastic, sugary death

 

Not that we’ve ever dunked our noses into a glass of Pepsi, because we’re not total weirdos, but according to a new patent filed by the soft drink manufacturer, PepsiCo Inc. is looking to develop a “scent capsule” under the cap of its plastic bottles so that each time the bottle is unsealed, a refreshing smell wafts over as you consume the sugary goodness. Sounds like an odd idea, but smell is one of our most primal senses, so we’ll play along here.

Received earlier this year, the PepsiCo patent accounts for a system where a gelatin capsule would be embedded into the cap. Upon the opening of the cap, breaking the seal, this capsule will rupture, releasing comforting scents to help consumers enjoy their drink a little more.

Continue Reading @ DigitalTrends

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wood

The Manliest Scent: Wood

Forget careful combinations of spice and bergamot, leather and primrose. When a man wants to smell like a man (who wants to smell like a cologne), there is one family of scents that he should turn to: wood. It's big, hearty, and dominant. Plus, it's what our ancestors wore. Granted, the smell most likely rubbed off on them after a day spent hunting in the forest or swinging an ax in preparation for winter, but the result is basically the same, just without the sweat. So save the light, citrusy colognes for spring and summer and the spicy musks for the fall holidays. This winter, you'll want to smell like wood.

And not just because we told you to. Woody colognes are experiencing a resurgence, according to Michael Edwards, an independent fragrance consultant and enthusiast. So you should see more and better options than ever. If you're looking for someone to thank, try women. They embraced the woody perfume market in recent years (albeit with more flowers, powders, and zest of lemon), and it seems the fragrance companies listened.

Woody colognes aren't simply a matter of opportunity. There are functional benefits, too: You need less, for one thing. Only oriental fragrances are heavier than woodys, which means only orientals last longer throughout the day. That weight also means woody scents hang close to your body. The only people who smell it will be you and whoever you allow to get close to you. Which can encourage nuzzling, if that's what you're into. As with any cologne, if you have dry skin you can be a little more generous in applying a woody fragrance. Cologne molecules bond with the oils in your skin, so the less you have (of oils), the more you'll need (of cologne). Still: Be reasonable.

Of all the new(ish) woody colognes, my favorite is [1] Encounter Calvin Klein ($50.73 for 3.4 oz; amazon.com). Like most woody fragrances, Encounter is paired with a citrus top note — in this case, mandarin — resulting in a scent that's somehow still deep and boozy, with rum, cognac, and a little bit of musk. By the time Encounter dries down, you're left with a subtle cedar smell, like you slept in the attic of a mountain cabin. [2] Victorinox Swiss Army Forest ($68 for 3.4 oz; swissarmy.com) starts lighter, thanks to notes of lemon and sage, but eventually ends with the familiar hearty smell of pine. Wear it if you like Christmas. [3] Dolce & Gabbana's the One Sport ($51 for 3.3 oz; amazon.com) initially smells very fresh, like you're cooking with rosemary. After an hour, you're left with just the right level of patchouli — an amount that says you're complementing a shower, not replacing it. [4] Bulgari Man ($79 for 3.4 oz; bulgari.com) has dominant top notes of violet, but if that's not your thing, just wait. You soon get a spicy musk that smells just a bit like vanilla. This is probably what Clooney smells like when he eats ice cream. The lightest of the options I tried is [5] Nautica Aqua Rush ($65 for 3.4 oz; nautica.com), which smells a lot like sitting on the deck of a ship with a mint julep in your hand. It's all water and mint, eventually settling on a simple and pleasant teak. If you can't afford a boat, this may be the closest you'll get.

Rodney Cutler is an Ironman triathlete and the owner of Cutler Salons in New York City.

Words and Phrases a Man Can Use to Describe His Cologne: woody; woodsy; spicy; peppery; warm; fruity; just like Grandpa's; light; bold; nutty; green; classic; subtle; evocative; fresh; mossy; pungent; musky; sharp; good.

A Few He Cannot: an experience; just like Grandma's; the aura of agarwood spiked by tonka bean; designer imposter; me.

Full Article @ Esquire

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scent-of-departure

The Scent of Departure: Bottled City Smells

They say your sense of smell is the one most strongly tied to memory, which sucks because that means the thing tourists remember most about America is that our country smells like piss… at least if they arrived at the Philly airport. But luckily Philly’s not on the list of bottled city smells from The Scent of Departure. They sell fragrances with the distinct smells of major cities around the world. For instance, Paris smells like armpits and cheese roses and lemons, while Tokyo smells like giant robot oil and Godzilla breath lotus, freesias and peonies. You know what, I’ve been to Paris—armpits and cheese is way more accurate. In fact, sometimes I like to eat brie, skip deodorant and reminisce about my trip. $45

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mbpreview2

Fragrance Company Recreates The Scent Of New Apple Products

Air Aroma collaborated with Melbourne-based artistic group – Greatest Hits – to create a unique fragrance that smells of an Apple product being opened for the first time. Artists Gavin Bell, Jarrah de Kuijer and Simon McGlinn wanted to encompass the Apple product scent, right down to the smell of the plastic wrap covering the box, the printed ink on the cardboard, and the aluminum laptop. To source this particular scent, Air Aroma had to contact fragrance suppliers in the South of France to send samples of fragrances with the aroma of glue, plastic, rubber and paper. Air Aroma fragrance designers then used these samples as ingredients to create a range of signature blend fragrances. The blends, each with unique recipes were then tested in the Air Aroma laboratory until a final fragrance was ultimately selected.

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