Tag Archives: edible

trutagpackaging

Packaging Spotlight: Edible barcodes set to tackle pharma fraud

 

TruTag has developed a nano-scale, encoded compound that is edible and can be used to attach data to pills and foodstuff.

 

How do patients know the medication they receive is the real deal? We’ve already seen the MedSnap ID app offer one way to quickly identify unlabeled pills, and now TruTag is providing another option, through a nano-scale, encoded compound that is edible and can be used to attach data to pills and foodstuff.

 

According to the company, counterfeit goods take away USD 600 billion from legitimate businesses each year, with ten percent of all medicines thought to be fake. Not only is this bad for business, it’s unsafe for patients. TruTag has developed an inert, edible silica solution that can be mixed into items such as pills, foods and other products in a nanoscopic layer with a code etched into it. The tags require no special technology to implement — simply mix a few particles of the powder-like compound into existing medicinal coatings or into food itself. When scanned with TruTag’s proprietary equipment, the codes reveal details about the content’s manufacture date and location, or other important details. The company even suggests that the tags could even be read by smartphones if the functionality was developed.

 

TruTags could help pharmaceutical companies to encrypt their physical products with data to help health professionals and consumers alike to ensure they have the real deal. Are there alternative ways to invisibly tag products to provide data on product histories and authenticity?

 

Website: www.trutags.com
Contact: www.trutags.com/contact-us

 

Full Article View SpringWise

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esslack

Technology Watch: World’s first edible spray paint

Anyone wanting a silver service experience won't have to splash out at a fancy restaurant - because they can now spray their food that colour.

Cookery fans can add a quick splash of colour to their food by simply spraying their favourite meals with the world's first edible spray paint.

The cans, called 'Food Finish,' come in gold, silver, red and blue.

the-deli-garage.de/

Dangle a carrot: Anyone wanting a silver service experience won't have to splash out at a fancy restaurant - because they can now spray their food that colourDangle a carrot: Anyone wanting a silver service experience won't have to splash out at a fancy restaurant - because they can now spray their food that colour

 

Strawberry
Strawberry

Feeling blue: The unique idea was created by German food company, The Deli Garage

The spray paint has no taste by itself and can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative to regular meals.

 To give the food a makeover, cooking enthusiasts must spray the paint layer by layer and wait for it to dry to enjoy the perfect finish.

The unique idea was created by German food company, The Deli Garage and sell for £21.50 online.

Golden touch: Frankfurters sprayed a different colour can bring a new theme to a meal Golden touch: Frankfurters sprayed a different colour can bring a new theme to a meal
Transformation: Even a red lobster can be transformed into a golden food delight Transformation: Even a red lobster can be transformed into a golden food delight

 

Project manager Kaya-Line Knust, 29, said: 'We love to invent and produce products that are fun for both us and our customers.

'We develop hundreds of ideas for new food products, but only a few of those product ideas can be created and placed onto the market.

'And I'm thrilled that the spray food is one of the ideas that made it.

Options: The new technique can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative
Options: The new technique can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative

Options: The new technique can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative

New look food: The cans, called 'Food Finish' come in gold, silver, red and blueNew look food: The cans, called 'Food Finish' come in gold, silver, red and blue

 

Quick change: The spray paint has no taste by itself and can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative to regular mealsQuick change: The spray paint has no taste by itself and can be applied on any item of food to offer a quirky alternative to regular meals

 

Spray: Project manager Kaya-Line Knust, 29, said: 'I love it when it's not only our cars which have a metallic finish but also our tomatoes'Spray: Project manager Kaya-Line Knust, 29, said: 'I love it when it's not only our cars which have a metallic finish but also our tomatoes'

Experience: Although the spray paint does not have a taste it can bring fun to a meal time Experience: Although the spray paint does not have a taste it can bring fun to a meal time

We all liked the idea from the beginning and luckily we found a manufacturer who can produce it for us.'

And the project manager, from Hamburg in Germany, feels that food looks better when it's sprayed in a sparkly colour.

She added: 'I love it when it's not only our cars which have a metallic finish but also our tomatoes.

'It's great when you see not only a steak on a plate, but a gold-plated one!

'We found out that it was not only us who love all that but also our customers - the food finish is our top seller and we get great feedback.'

 Esslack is food coloring in a spray can. With the two colors of gold and silver finishes it’s a delectable delight of all kinds.”esslack2esslack3esslack4

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Innovative: The edible food spray cans which originated in Germany

Full Article @ DM

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ediblecup

Flavored ‘glassware’ you can eat after you drink

A New York-based company has launched a line of edible cups, designed to be crunched as a snack after the drink is finished.

Intended to complement the beverages they contain, Loliware'sall-natural vegan flavors include mixologist favorites such as bitter bitters, sweet vanilla and spicy pepper.

For those who don't fancy eating their drinking receptacle, the cups are all biodegradable too, making them an eco-friendly alternative to plastic cups.

LOLIWAREMade for eating AND drinking: New York company Loliware makes all-natural edible 'glassware'

Loliware, created by Brooklyn design studio The Way We See The World, looks more appealing too. The shape of the cup mimics that of vintage glassware.

According to Today.com, the cups have 'a soft texture that’s easy to bite into.'

 

The reviewer adds that the 'flavor is seriously intense' - particularly the salty lime.

The cups are sold in batches of 48 (containing one flavor only), at $144 per box - and, for now, are only available to those in new York City.

LOLIWAREMixologist's choice: The cups come in bartender-approved flavors in an array of colors including (from left) sweet vanilla, salty lime, sour lemon, spicy pepper and bitter bitters

Nor should they be ordered too far in advance: the cups are perishable and are only fresh for three days after delivery.

The Way We See The World has developed ideas for companies such as PepsiCo, Waterford Crystal, and L'Oreal.

The design collective, an all-female team of Parson's School of Design graduates, say they 'innovate passionately with the aim of creating happiness by design.'
Full Article @ DM

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Company-Invents-Deo-Perfume-Candy-the-Edible-Deodorant

Introducing Edible Deodorant

Ever tire of swiping Speed Stick on your tender underarms? Ever wish your sweat smelled like a garden bouquet?

Introducing the newest addition to the growing group of “functional foods” and “edi-cosmedis”: Edible deodorant. And no, not that kind, you sicko. No armpit-licking is required.

American company Beneo and Bulgarian confectioner Alpi have created the Deo Perfume Candy, a rose-flavored candy that claims to make a person excrete a floral aroma for up to six hours. Their website explains:

Geraniol is a natural antioxidant and its fragrance, once consumed as a candy, leaves the body through its pores, creating a naturally sweet smell that can last for hours.

The treats look like throat lozenges and are packaged in girly pink and purple. There’s even a sugar free version for those who want to smell good and stay svelte. While the U.S. has yet to stock their shelves with the product (and where would drugstores even put it– the candy aisle or the deodorant aisle?), it’s already sold in Germany, China, Korea, Armenia, and Spain.

Deo Perfume Candy is great for those days when you forget to apply Old Spice, Secret, or whatever your pit stain poison. All you have to do is pop one in your mouth and let the wind waft your heavenly scent through the air.

via HuffPost

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A selection of packaged goods

Edible packaging: fancy a wrap?

Packaging you can eat is said to be the next big thing. Question is, after storage and handling, would you want to?

Pouring your milk then eating the bottle sounds less than tempting, but edible packaging is being touted as food technology's next Big Thing.

It's not entirely new, of course. Heston Blumenthal's been at it for years, wrapping palatable paper around packets of soup and urging us to eat salted caramels wrapper and all. Anyone who has eaten turron also knows the slightly odd sensation of rice paper melting in their mouth. But two US companies are currently vying to be the first to commercially exploit the "untapped market" for wrappers you can munch.

Leading the way (in publicity terms, at least) is the Dumbledore of food technology, Harvard wizard Dr David Edwards whose previous innovations include an "breathable" chocolate delightfully called Le Whif. He has now turned his attention to WikiCells - an edible membrane made from a biodegradable polymer and food particles - that can imitate "bottles" found in nature, such as grape skins.

Full Article @ Guardian

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NewGoldEdibleSensorsCanTellYouIfYourFoodisSpoiled

Scientists Develop Edible Sensors to Detect Food Spoilage

Can't decide if that milk is just one day past its prime? Trying to figure out if it's time to cut that pineapple on the window sill? Wonder no more. Scientists at Tufts University have created edible silk sensors that can be applied to any food or float in liquids to inform you when your food has hit peak ripeness or when it's spoiled rotten.

The sensors are made from silk and gold (fancy, huh?) and are tiny, thin stickers that are small enough to be placed on cherry tomatoes. You may wonder if you can really eat silk and gold. According to the research study, which was published in Advanced Materials, "These types of passive, chip-less sensor consist of an antenna or an array of antennas/resonators made of only a sub-micron thickness of gold, a level equivalent to common edible gold leaf/flakes used on cakes and chocolates." And silk? It's actually a protein that will "safely interface with consumable goods or can be in direct contact with food." But if you don't want to eat the sensors, you can just slice them off of the food and dispose of them. Good news — they are also biodegradable.

Glue isn't necessary to hold the sensor on your food. According to Co.Exist.com, "The silk film doubles up as the sensor’s glue, turning sticky when exposed to water. The sensor is then pasted directly onto the food that needs tracking, eliminating the need for an additional glue to keep it clinging on." The researchers tested the effectiveness of the sensors on bananas, eggs, apples, cheese, and even milk.

But how does this little sticker actually work? "When a fruit ripens or rots, chemical changes churn around inside it. Those changes and differences in the stiffness of the fruit translate to what’s called their dielectric properties," explains FastCoexist.com. The gold detects those changes and then emits an electromagnetic signal. "We can tailor our sensor to be extremely sensitive to the change of the dielectric property," Hu "Tiger" Tao, a Tufts researcher on the project, explained to Co.Exist.com.

While it sounds like a nifty way to monitor those bananas, the researchers are banking on this scientific breakthrough to help manufacturers and suppliers better manage food safety.

"Food safety is an increasingly important public health issue for both the consumer and food industry," the study noted. Researchers believe using the sensors could aid quality control of agricultural and biological food products in the future.

Would you use these edible stickers to monitor your food?

via

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